Shooting Video for Editing


The ability to edit what you shoot and have it come out making sense requires you to think about how your shots will be combined together before you take them.
That doesn’t mean that every single edit needs to be meticulously planned in advance, but it does require that you have a sense of what shots you’ll need later when you sit down at the computer.
In the spirit of…
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Teradek Ace Wireless Video Makes the Grade

Teradek recently released a great video detailing the Ace Wireless transmitter being used in Education.

Check it out below!

Live Streaming is a great way to engage your audience. In education, it is a great way to bring your school up to speed on technology.

Wilmington University, a non-profit undergraduate & graduate college based in New Castle, Delaware, found the answer with zero-delay wireless video. Essentially, wireless video is the sending of A/V from camera to switcher completely wirelessly, removing the need for any HDMI or SDI cables. 

teradek.com

Check out the full article to learn more

Learn more about Teradek HERE

The post Teradek Ace Wireless Video Makes the Grade appeared first on Videoguys Blog.

https://videoguys.com/blog/teradek-ace-wireless-video-makes-the-grade/

Repetition (Max Cooper)

Filmmaker Kevin McGloughlin (previously) finds instances of repetition in the world around us and then uses digital compositing techniques to extend them into absurdity, yoked to a muscular, minimalist score by Max Cooper. The results of the two artists’ collaboration feels as much of a piece with the folding, tumbling architecture of Inception as with the hypnotic reveries of landscapes and cityscapes in Koyaanisqatsi.

 

 

The post Repetition (Max Cooper) appeared first on Studio Daily.

https://www.studiodaily.com/2019/09/repetition-max-cooper/

Panasonic Lays Out Future Plans for IT/IP Video

Revealing the IP-based video platform that it plans to launch in 2020, Panasonic said it expects its open architecture to become central to video production, handling video processing, audio mixing and serving.

Panasonic calls the new platform resolution- and format-independent, and said it uses CPU and GPU processing — leveraging the capabilities inherent in off-the-shelf IT hardware — to increase performance. The system will support uncompressed input and video processing and will simultaneously support both baseband and IP signals, including ST2110 and NDI, with one-frame latency, Panasonic said.

The first product to use the new architecture will be a live IP video switcher for broadcast, Panasonic said.

“This new modular and open architecture platform is a game-changer for many customers involved in high-quality video production and delivery, either live or in the studio, allowing customers to optimize and future-proof their investment while maintaining the ultimate in flexibility,” said Andre Meterian, Panasonic EMEA Director at the Professional Video Systems Business unit, in a pre-IBC statement. “The Live IP Switching application is just the start for this new platform. Its video processing architecture allows users to build and run any kind of application.”

In addition to the IP video switcher, Panasonic demonstrated a range of upcoming hardware at IBC. For example, the company brought along an 8K organic sensor — so described because it incorporates a layer of organic, photoconductive film developed by Fujifilm — that it plans to deploy for the first time at the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. The sensor has a global shutter design and an electronic ND filter is built in, the company said.

Also on display was the AK-SHB800 8K camera, AK-SHU800 processing unit (both pictured, above) and AK-SFC101 framing control software that’s slated to ship in Europe later this month. The 8K camera can generate four different full-resolution HD signals from a single 8K camera, cropping different areas out of the full image. A single operator will be able to control multiple linked cameras, each with pre-set crops, for multi-camera operation, Panasonic said. The full system will be sold as a kit for approximately €130,000 ($143,000), the company said.

Panasonic AV-UHS500

Panasonic AV-UHS500
Panasonic

And a traditional 4K broadcast switcher, the AV-UHS500, is aimed at event staging, outside broadcast vans, and events at educational institutions and conference halls. Scheduled for a February release, the UHS500 has five keyers, including two channels of chroma and two channels of picture-in-picture, and supports optional add-in boards that can increase capacity up to 16 SDI or eight HDMI inputs. It supports up- and down-conversion, HDR/SDR conversions, and Rec. 2020/Rec. 709 conversions.

The post Panasonic Lays Out Future Plans for IT/IP Video appeared first on Studio Daily.

https://www.studiodaily.com/2019/09/panasonic-lays-future-plans-itip-video/

After Effects Classic Course: Set Matte versus Track Matte

One of the most useful compositing features in After Effects is the ability to use the properties of one layer to create transparency (an alpha channel) for a second layer. To do this, many use the Track Matte feature that’s available in the Timeline. However, there is also an effect plug-in – Set Matte – which can also do the same thing. In this movie, we compare the pros and cons of each approach.

(If you are not already familiar with Compound Effects – which Set Matte is – see this post for more background.)

This movie previously appeared in our Insight Into Effects course on Lynda.com/LinkedIn Learning. They’ve retired that course from their library, so we’re making the movies from it available publicly for free. You can either scan our page on ProVideo Coalition to see the other free movies, or click here for the playlist of previous movies we’ve made available.

The post After Effects Classic Course: Set Matte versus Track Matte appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

https://www.provideocoalition.com/after-effects-classic-course-set-matte-versus-track-matte/

After Effects Classic Course: Set Matte versus Track Matte

One of the most useful compositing features in After Effects is the ability to use the properties of one layer to create transparency (an alpha channel) for a second layer. To do this, many use the Track Matte feature that’s available in the Timeline. However, there is also an effect plug-in – Set Matte – which can also do the same thing. In this movie, we compare the pros and cons of each approach.

(If you are not already familiar with Compound Effects – which Set Matte is – see this post for more background.)

This movie previously appeared in our Insight Into Effects course on Lynda.com/LinkedIn Learning. They’ve retired that course from their library, so we’re making the movies from it available publicly for free. You can either scan our page on ProVideo Coalition to see the other free movies, or click here for the playlist of previous movies we’ve made available.

The post After Effects Classic Course: Set Matte versus Track Matte appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

https://www.provideocoalition.com/after-effects-classic-course-set-matte-versus-track-matte/